The Christian Adventure......

Proverbs 27:17

Proverbs 27:17

Monday, September 28, 2020

The Berean - Matthew 5:44 NASB

The Berean - Matthew 5:44 NASB  

(44) “But I say to you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, 

New American Standard Bible


We might think for a moment, “Who are our enemies?” Many of us believe we have no enemies. However, an enemy might be someone we thought was a friend, a family member with a long-held grudge, or even a brother or sister in Christ. An enemy can be someone we feel does not like us and has hurt or mistreated us. Whether we consider them enemies or not, there is no denying their hostility. In the same verse, Jesus goes on to expand His list of hostiles: “Bless those who curse you, do good to those who hate you, and pray for those who spitefully use you and persecute you.”


We have probably all been through this particular trial and test as we grow to love one another as brethren. The church is just like a big family, where people can be hurt or feel mistreated in one way or another. Conflicts, misunderstandings, and slights—real or imagined—occur in every group of human beings, Christian or not.


It is very difficult to “love,” “bless,” “do good,” and “pray” for a person who has hurt us deeply. It goes against our human nature to behave positively toward someone we feel deserves shame, censure, and punishment! Putting this principle into practice is a high hurdle for any Christian to clear.


Yet, as Christians, we know that forgiveness is one of the keys that Jesus taught for healing. Not only is it a teaching—it is also a command. Christ admonishes us to keep this charge in His model prayer in Matthew 6:12: “Forgive us our debts as we forgive our debtors.” Alternatively, it could be said, “Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who have sinned against us” (see Luke 11:4).


Jesus comments further on this in Matthew 6:14-15: “For if you forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. But if you do not forgive men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.”


In Matthew 18:21-22, we find another example: “Then Peter came to Him and said, “Lord, how often shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? Up to seven times?” Jesus said to him, “I do not say to you, up to seven times, but up to seventy times seven.” In other words, we must always be willing to forgive a brother.


— Staff

If you openly declare that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.

If you openly declare that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.: If you openly declare that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.

Psalms 85:2 KJV

September 28, 2020

Verse of the Day

Thou hast forgiven the iniquity of thy people, thou hast covered all their sin. Selah. 
Psalms 85:2 KJV

You Are the Girl for the Job Week 4 — Face the Fear

You Are the Girl for the Job Week 4 — Face the Fear: We demolish arguments and every pretension that sets itself up against the knowledge of God, and we take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ. — 2 Corinthians 10:5 Even though I walk through the darkest valley, I will fear no evil, for You are with me. — Psalm 23:4 We get toa href='https://www.faithgateway.com/you-are-the-girl-for-the-job-week-4-face-the-fear/' title='Read more' .../a

Leaders Need Prayer Too

Leaders Need Prayer Too: Editor’s Note: A Prayer for Every Occasion launches Nationwide on Tuesday, September 29, 2020! Enjoy this excerpt of prayers specifically for people in positions of power in our nation and in our world. We hope it helps offer some hope and aids in offering specific prayer to God when praying for our leaders. * Almightya href='https://www.faithgateway.com/leaders-need-prayer-too/' title='Read more' .../a

Rediscover your purpose

Rediscover your purpose 

The Berean - Revelation 3:17

The Berean - Revelation 3:17  
(17) Because you say, “I am rich, have become wealthy, and have need of nothing”—and do not know that you are wretched, miserable, poor, blind, and naked— 
New King James Version
The Laodicean may not necessarily say these things consciously, but he broadcasts it for all to see by his works and way of life! He thinks he lives in his “golden years.” Being blind to his own spiritual poverty, however, is the real tragedy of his situation. He thinks he is in good standing with GodChristjudges differently, very concerned that the Laodicean cannot see his spiritual condition. He is spiritually bereft.

Christ describes the Laodicean as “poor.” Biblically, “poor” does not mean the same as our normal English usage of the word. It indicates someone who is weak, with no consideration of how wealthy he may be. To God, the Laodicean is spiritually weak, when he thinks he is strong.

Next, he is “blind.” Of course, this is not physical blindness but a lack of spiritual comprehension or judgment. Just as a blind person cannot use his eyes to judge a circumstance, the Laodicean is unaware, unknowing, unobservant, uncomprehending, and heedless.

Christ also judges him as “naked.” Clothing—or its lack—illustrates a person’s state of righteousness, and here it shows converted people who are still carnal, as Paul called the Corinthians (I Corinthians 3:3). The Laodicean is dominated by his fleshly attitudes. Physically oriented, he is governed by human nature, rather than by God.

“Wretched and miserable” together provide further descriptions of “poor, blind, and naked.” Because they are poor, blind, and naked, they are wretched and miserable, even though they have not realized it. Miserable has been translated elsewhere as “pitiful” or “pitiable.” Wretched is especially interesting. In other places in the New Testament, it indicates destitution because of war. God means that while they may be wealthy, they are losing the spiritual war against Satan and their carnal nature.
— John W. Ritenbaugh